Puzzle 210: Freestyle 175. Nailed it!

Last Tuesday’s freestyle solution

Get the PDF here!

Get the PUZ here!

Word count: 70
Mean word length: 5.46

Have something you wanna say? Got a question? Want to do a guest freestyle? Want to collaborate on a freestyle? Want to just say hello? Hit me up by email!

This grid has an unusual shape to it, and, whenever you see an unusual shape for a freestyle grid, you can be sure that the constructor really, really wanted to make a stack work. This was no exception. I had to have more long answers than usual intersecting the main stack, and I was pretty fortunate that those down answers worked out that way. Sometimes, you get to a point where it looks like the intersecting answers are all coalescing perfectly, until you get to one snag that causes you to rip up the whole grid around the stack and start again. Not so this time.

As always, I’d like to know, folks… comment is welcome! Come say hello! What did you like? What could I do better?

As always, share this link! Pass it around! New puzzle on Friday!

Puzzle 209: Freestyle 174. Gobble up this grid with your leftovers.

Last Friday’s freestyle solution

Get the PDF here!

Get the PUZ here!

Word count: 70
Mean word length: 5.49

Have something you wanna say? Got a question? Want to do a guest freestyle? Want to collaborate on a freestyle? Want to just say hello? Hit me up by email!

I hope all you American folks had a happy Thanksgiving! I trust you have awoken sufficiently enough from your food comas (fun fact: your sleepiness after T-day dinner is not caused by tryptophan — turkey doesn’t really contain that much different amounts of it than other common meats, it’s simply the quantity of food and the influx of heavy carbs) and recovered enough from the body blows you were dealt (or the body blows you delivered) on Black Friday to coherently solve this grid. I don’t usually like to create grids-within-a-grid here (that is, sections of the grid that could be completely shut off with the addition of one black square), but the sections in the upper left and lower right eventually would demand that I do it.

As always, I’d like to know, folks… comment is welcome! Come say hello! What did you like? What could I do better?

As always, share this link! Pass it around! New puzzle on Tuesday!

Puzzle 208: Freestyle 173. Don’t mind me, I’m throwing ideas around.

Last Tuesday’s freestyle solution

Get the PDF here!

Get the PUZ here!

Word count: 70
Mean word length: 5.51

Have something you wanna say? Got a question? Want to do a guest freestyle? Want to collaborate on a freestyle? Want to just say hello? Hit me up by email!

One of the seeds for this one is normal, and one is… a bit unusual. Usually, a seed is an interesting expression, or a modern up-and-coming phrase, what have you. I don’t know what struck me about the seed that ended up at 14-Down that I felt like I had to prioritize it, but I thought it was neat nonetheless. I have nothing to do with chemistry, aside from a class I had to take my freshman year of college. But when something strikes that particular part of my brain (yes, my brain has a particular part like that), I don’t question it, I just go with it.

As always, I’d like to know, folks… comment is welcome! Come say hello! What did you like? What could I do better?

As always, share this link! Pass it around! New puzzle on Friday!

Puzzle 207: Freestyle 172. This grid should be just your type.

Last Friday’s WordKen solution

Get the PDF here!

Get the PUZ here!

Word count: 72
Mean word length: 5.28

Have something you wanna say? Got a question? Want to do a guest freestyle? Want to collaborate on a freestyle? Want to just say hello? Hit me up by email!

Another standard 8×6 offering (well, hopefully not a standard puzzle, just my old standby block formation) today. I really should try constructing from the bottom up sometimes — some say that it’s easier to do that, and I can surmise why. It just seems like it would be more flexible to start with the ends of the down entries. Someone may want to back me up on this, but I want to guess that a lot fewer  different letters make up a similar percentage of English word endings than a lot more letters make up word beginnings. (…if that makes any sense. I’m trying to say that I’m guessing that, say, if [x] number of letters make up 90% of word endings, and [y] number of letters make up 90% of all word beginnings, then [x] is significantly less than [y].) I could be way, way off base, but I’m curious to know. Preliminary research shows that about half of all words end in E, D, S, or T, so there’s that for my theory, but I’m wondering if the pattern expands beyond that.

As always, I’d like to know, folks… comment is welcome! Come say hello! What did you like? What could I do better?

As always, share this link! Pass it around! New puzzle on Tuesday!

Puzzle 206: Freestyle 171. Getting back to nature.

Last Tuesday’s freestyle solution

Get the PDF here!

Get the PUZ here!

Word count: 70
Mean word length: 5.46

Have something you wanna say? Got a question? Want to do a guest freestyle? Want to collaborate on a freestyle? Want to just say hello? Hit me up by email!

If a crossword grid is the reflection of the state of mind of the constructor at the time of construction, then I must have been experiencing an… interesting collection of feelings when I set down the two seeds at 36-Across and 8-Down. Also know that 15-Across was a seed in that region… I guess you can formulate your own conclusion.

As always, I’d like to know, folks… comment is welcome! Come say hello! What did you like? What could I do better?

As always, share this link! Pass it around! New puzzle on Friday!

Puzzle 205: WordKen.

Last Friday’s Synograms solution

Get the PDF here!

Have something you wanna say? Got a question? Want to do a guest freestyle? Want to collaborate on a freestyle? Want to just say hello? Hit me up by email!

Before I say anything else, I’d like to call your attention to something I did in last Friday’s variety puzzle. I got an email suggestion that I create a version of Synograms that contains the number of letters in each city’s name. I liked that suggestion so much that I did just that. So, if you’ve been having trouble getting started with last Friday’s puzzle (or you missed last week’s post), click the above link to check it out.

This week’s variety puzzle is a sort of hybrid. I love the daily KenKen puzzles on the New York Times puzzle section and on this website. If you’re not familiar with KenKen, click on the link — it’s a brilliant puzzle invented by a Japanese math teacher that’s sort of a combination of sudoku and math. As you might deduce from the title, WordKen is a sort of adaptation of KenKen for words. The letters of the words to be put in each of the “cages” must be placed in such a way that no letter is repeated in any row or column.

As always, I’d like to know, folks… comment is welcome! Come say hello! What did you like? What could I do better?

As always, share this link! Pass it around! New puzzle on Tuesday!

Puzzle 204: Freestyle 170. You can’t make this stuff up!

Last Tuesday’s freestyle solution

Get the PDF here!

Get the PUZ here!

Word count: 70
Mean word length: 5.40

Have something you wanna say? Got a question? Want to do a guest freestyle? Want to collaborate on a freestyle? Want to just say hello? Hit me up by email!

Well, if you’re in the US, you can add this to the puzzle packet that you can take to the nuclear fallout shelter so you’ll have something to keep you occupied when all hell inevitably breaks loose. Whenever you see weird clusters of blocks, know that the constructor pretty much was configuring the grid at all costs to fit certain entries. This was the case here, definitely. I had three seeds that I found would only interlock in a certain way, and this was really the only way the grid could work well with these three entries, aesthetics be damned.

As always, I’d like to know, folks… comment is welcome! Come say hello! What did you like? What could I do better?

As always, share this link! Pass it around! New puzzle on Friday!